Some of the best things I found on the internet this week:

  • The Dirty Secret of Public Speaking – and What to Do About It – Nick Morgan regularly offers the most effective insight on what makes for a good presentation. This post highlights the reality that most audiences rarely remember much of anything a speaker says. Morgan offers some good tips on overcoming that along with this challenge: “make sure that your speech is about only one idea.” I struggle with this, too often relying on a quantity of ideas in the hope that it will be more likely for everyone in the audience to find something of value.
  • How the Rams Built a Laboratory for Millennials – WSJ – In addition to shorter meetings and later wake up calls, this NFL team is adjusting to a different generational mindset by regularly drilling down to one key question, a question everyone should ask no matter your generation:

They also need to know “why” to everything: If you explain a concept to them on the field, they need to know the reason behind it. Millennial players questioning everything is something that’s helped the Rams, the team says, because it forces coaches and executives to examine their own methods (Why are we doing this?).

“I don’t agree that you, when you become students at colleges, have to be coddled and protected from different points of view. I think you should be able to — anybody who comes to speak to you and you disagree with, you should have an argument with ‘em. But you shouldn’t silence them by saying, ‘You can’t come because I’m too sensitive to hear what you have to say.’ That’s not the way we learn either.”

Goals are individual experiences and accomplishments you strive for. A vision is the bigger picture. Your life’s vision defines who you want to be, what you want to be known for and the set of experiences and accomplishments you aim for. Your vision helps define the goals by giving you a framework to evaluate those goals.

Your vision becomes your why.