David Cain, in the most recent post on his consistently insightful blog, Raptitude, discusses the malleable nature of reality and the perspective you can cultivate that your life is always just beginning, like a movie scene coming to life from black:

When you can look at any moment as though it’s the first moment, if you can really see your surroundings as the opening frame in a story, the world gains a certain playfulness. Suddenly your problems seem more interesting than annoying, the way another person’s problems always seem easier to solve than your own. It’s almost impossible to be impatient with others, because it’s fascinating that they’re even there. You still care about outcomes, but it’s far easier to relax around the possibilities. Any uptightness about making things go a certain way seems a bit silly, because it already seems unlikely that anything is even happening, and that you’re at the helm.

This magic only happens in a vivid awareness of the present moment.

Usually, we are numbly going through the motions, unaware that the moment we are living through is this dynamic, unique, priceless bit of stranger-than-fiction reality.

You are part of something. You are somewhere rather than nowhere.

You just have to wake up regularly and see that your story is beginning anew each moment.

Cain closes with this:

In other words, being alive seems like no big deal, until you can imagine, for a moment, what it means not to be alive: no experience, and no story. When you can see the present moment as though the camera has just started rolling, you get a hint of just how rich it is, and has always been.